Writing prompts about fictional book characters

When children step into the world of books, the characters they encounter can seem as real as their own friends and family.

These writing prompts about fictional characters will help them use their imaginations to engage with literary friends who live inside the pages of their favorite novels!

 

Writing prompts about fictional characters help children use their imaginations to engage with make-believe friends who live inside favorite books.

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1. What Would Frodo Do?

What fictional character do you most admire? Is it spunky Anne Shirley from the Anne of Green Gables series? Wise Aslan from The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe? Optimistic Sara Crewe from A Little Princess? Frodo, the selfless hobbit from The Lord of the Rings? How about Freckles, that young man of such high integrity?

When we face challenges, it often helps to seek advice from someone we look up to. Think of a book character who has earned your respect, and write a letter to him or her asking for advice.

2. You Were There

If you could be friends with a character in one of your favorite books, whose friend would you be? Choose an experience from the book and rewrite it in your own words as if the two of you had been there together.

3. Let’s Talk

Imagine a conversation between a fictional character and a member of your family, such as your mom or little brother. Write this conversation in dialog form.

4. Inquiring Minds Want to Know

You are a journalist for a newspaper. For a future article, your editor has assigned you to interview a fictional character from one of your favorite novels. Which character will you choose to interview? What would you like to learn about him or her? Come up with three questions to ask, and then write down this character’s answers.

Be sure to check back each week for more Writing Prompt Wednesdays!

Photos: Smudge 9000 (Anne of Green Gables), Corey Leopold (lion), Tom Garnett (Frodo) courtesy of Creative Commons

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