Creative writing ideas for reluctant writers

Creative writing ideas for reluctant writers that invite kids to invent a holiday, make a poster, and write from the perspective of a disgruntled car.

Not all reluctant writers resist writing for the same reason. Some struggle with fine-motor coordination or pencil grip, making the physical act of writing painful and disheartening. Others have a hard time getting the words out of their heads and onto the paper. Both types of reluctant writer benefit from dictating their ideas to Mom or Dad so they can direct their energies toward formulating their thoughts.

Still others wrestle to come up with topics. When “I don’t know what to write about!” escapes from their lips, a fun, silly, or meaningful prompt can save the day! That little push in the right direction might be all they need to take the ball and run with it.

Here are four creative writing ideas for reluctant writers. Which one will your child choose first?

1. Car Care 101

Imagine that you are your family’s car. Lately, you have been feeling mistreated and unappreciated. Write a letter of complaint to the family explaining your situation and suggesting ways they can take better care of you.

2. The Way I See It

Reports aren’t the only way to show that you understand facts about something. Today, pretend you’re a scorpion, honey bee, snake, or other living creature you’re learning about in your science or nature studies. Write a diary entry from this creature’s point of view. Your diary entry can be funny or serious. Just make sure you include at least three facts about the insect, reptile, or other animal you’re journaling as.

3. “Invent a Holiday” Day

Did you know the calendar is filled with wacky, strange, and little-known holidays such as Do a Grouch a Favor Day, National Doughnut Day, Elephant Appreciation Day, Moldy Cheese Day, Name Your Car Day, and Be Humble Day?

Think of something you’d like to celebrate for a day, such as a favorite food or animal. Or think of something you’d like to encourage others to do for a day, such as “walk on stilts” or “be kind to ants.” Give your holiday a name and write a paragraph explaining some of the ways people could celebrate or participate in this new day.

4. Lost His Marbles

When a dog or cat goes missing, the family will often seek help by making a lost and found poster and stapling it to a telephone pole. But what do you do when someone loses their voice, memory, sense of smell, manners, patience, courage, or sense of humor?

Imagine that someone in your family has lost one of these things. Where was it last seen? Who is most desperate for its return? Are you offering a reward? What action should the “finder” take? Create a poster asking for its recovery. Be sure your poster answers who, what, when, where, and why.

If your reluctant writer enjoyed these writing prompts, be sure to check back each week for more Writing Prompt Wednesdays. Even your most writing-phobic child is sure to find a prompt that pleases!

Perfection

Photo: Transformers Man, courtesy of Creative Commons 2.0

2 Comments

  • Posted August 11, 2017

    Glenda Cates

    I love these ideals and I have been trying to get my son to work on his blog so I might just borrow the post as topics for him to write about on it. Have a wonderful day and thank you for putting this post together.

    • Posted August 11, 2017

      Kim Kautzer

      You’re welcome! I hope your son enjoys having some fun new writing topics!

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